Wednesday, May 31, 2017

2017 Bilderberg Meeting Agenda


  1. The Trump Administration: A progress report 
  2. Trans-Atlantic relations: options and scenarios
  3. The Trans-Atlantic defence alliance: bullets, bytes and bucks
  4. The direction of the EU
  5. Can globalisation be slowed down?
  6. Jobs, income and unrealised expectations
  7. The war on information
  8. Why is populism growing?
  9. Russia in the international order
  10. The Near East
  11. Nuclear proliferation
  12. China
  13. Current events
The list of 2017 Bilderberg attendees is here.

The Federal Reserve Beige Book

The Summary of Commentary on Current Economic Conditions by Federal Reserve District is commonly known as the "Beige Book."

The report is published eight times per year.

Each Federal Reserve Bank gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its District through reports from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources.

The Beige Book summarizes this information by District and sector. An overall summary of the twelve district reports is prepared by a designated Federal Reserve Bank on a rotating basis.

(via The Federal Reserve)

2017 BILDERBERG MEETING Participants

Chantilly VA, USA 1-4 June


CHAIRMAN
Castries, Henri de (FRA), Former Chairman and CEO, AXA; President of Institut Montaigne

PARTICIPANTS

  • Achleitner, Paul M. (DEU), Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Deutsche Bank AG
  • Adonis, Andrew (GBR), Chair, National Infrastructure Commission
  • Agius, Marcus (GBR), Chairman, PA Consulting Group
  • Akyol, Mustafa (TUR), Senior Visiting Fellow, Freedom Project at Wellesley College
  • Alstadheim, Kjetil B. (NOR), Political Editor, Dagens Næringsliv
  • Altman, Roger C. (USA), Founder and Senior Chairman, Evercore
  • Arnaut, José Luis (PRT), Managing Partner, CMS Rui Pena & Arnaut
  • Barroso, José M. Durão (PRT), Chairman, Goldman Sachs International
  • Bäte, Oliver (DEU), CEO, Allianz SE
  • Baumann, Werner (DEU), Chairman, Bayer AG
  • Baverez, Nicolas (FRA), Partner, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher
  • Benko, René (AUT), Founder and Chairman of the Advisory Board, SIGNA Holding GmbH
  • Berner, Anne-Catherine (FIN), Minister of Transport and Communications
  • Botín, Ana P. (ESP), Executive Chairman, Banco Santander
  • Brandtzæg, Svein Richard (NOR), President and CEO, Norsk Hydro ASA
  • Brennan, John O. (USA), Senior Advisor, Kissinger Associates Inc.
  • Bsirske, Frank (DEU), Chairman, United Services Union
  • Buberl, Thomas (FRA), CEO, AXA
  • Bunn, M. Elaine (USA), Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense
  • Burns, William J. (USA), President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • Çakiroglu, Levent (TUR), CEO, Koç Holding A.S.
  • Çamlibel, Cansu (TUR), Washington DC Bureau Chief, Hürriyet Newspaper
  • Cebrián, Juan Luis (ESP), Executive Chairman, PRISA and El País
  • Clemet, Kristin (NOR), CEO, Civita
  • Cohen, David S. (USA), Former Deputy Director, CIA
  • Collison, Patrick (USA), CEO, Stripe
  • Cotton, Tom (USA), Senator
  • Cui, Tiankai (CHN), Ambassador to the US
  • Döpfner, Mathias (DEU), CEO, Axel Springer SE
  • Elkann, John (ITA), Chairman, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles
  • Enders, Thomas (DEU), CEO, Airbus SE
  • Federspiel, Ulrik (DNK), Group Executive, Haldor Topsøe Holding A/S
  • Ferguson, Jr., Roger W. (USA), President and CEO, TIAA
  • Ferguson, Niall (USA), Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
  • Gianotti, Fabiola (ITA), Director General, CERN
  • Gozi, Sandro (ITA), State Secretary for European Affairs
  • Graham, Lindsey (USA), Senator
  • Greenberg, Evan G. (USA), Chairman and CEO, Chubb Group
  • Griffin, Kenneth (USA), Founder and CEO, Citadel Investment Group, LLC
  • Gruber, Lilli (ITA), Editor-in-Chief and Anchor "Otto e mezzo", La7 TV
  • Guindos, Luis de (ESP), Minister of Economy, Industry and Competiveness
  • Haines, Avril D. (USA), Former Deputy National Security Advisor
  • Halberstadt, Victor (NLD), Professor of Economics, Leiden University
  • Hamers, Ralph (NLD), Chairman, ING Group
  • Hedegaard, Connie (DNK), Chair, KR Foundation
  • Hennis-Plasschaert, Jeanine (NLD), Minister of Defence, The Netherlands
  • Hobson, Mellody (USA), President, Ariel Investments LLC
  • Hoffman, Reid (USA), Co-Founder, LinkedIn and Partner, Greylock
  • Houghton, Nicholas (GBR), Former Chief of Defence
  • Ischinger, Wolfgang (INT), Chairman, Munich Security Conference
  • Jacobs, Kenneth M. (USA), Chairman and CEO, Lazard
  • Johnson, James A. (USA), Chairman, Johnson Capital Partners
  • Jordan, Jr., Vernon E. (USA), Senior Managing Director, Lazard Frères & Co. LLC
  • Karp, Alex (USA), CEO, Palantir Technologies
  • Kengeter, Carsten (DEU), CEO, Deutsche Börse AG
  • Kissinger, Henry A. (USA), Chairman, Kissinger Associates Inc.
  • Klatten, Susanne (DEU), Managing Director, SKion GmbH
  • Kleinfeld, Klaus (USA), Former Chairman and CEO, Arconic
  • Knot, Klaas H.W. (NLD), President, De Nederlandsche Bank
  • Koç, Ömer M. (TUR), Chairman, Koç Holding A.S.
  • Kotkin, Stephen (USA), Professor in History and International Affairs, Princeton University
  • Kravis, Henry R. (USA), Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, KKR
  • Kravis, Marie-Josée (USA), Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute
  • Kudelski, André (CHE), Chairman and CEO, Kudelski Group
  • Lagarde, Christine (INT), Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
  • Lenglet, François (FRA), Chief Economics Commentator, France 2
  • Leysen, Thomas (BEL), Chairman, KBC Group
  • Liddell, Christopher (USA), Assistant to the President and Director of Strategic Initiatives
  • Lööf, Annie (SWE), Party Leader, Centre Party
  • Mathews, Jessica T. (USA), Distinguished Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • McAuliffe, Terence (USA), Governor of Virginia
  • McKay, David I. (CAN), President and CEO, Royal Bank of Canada
  • McMaster, H.R. (USA), National Security Advisor
  • Mexia, António Luís Guerra Nunes (PRT), President, Eurelectric and CEO, EDP Energias de Portugal
  • Micklethwait, John (INT), Editor-in-Chief, Bloomberg LP
  • Minton Beddoes, Zanny (INT), Editor-in-Chief, The Economist
  • Molinari, Maurizio (ITA), Editor-in-Chief, La Stampa
  • Monaco, Lisa (USA), Former Homeland Security Officer
  • Morneau, Bill (CAN), Minister of Finance
  • Mundie, Craig J. (USA), President, Mundie & Associates
  • Murtagh, Gene M. (IRL), CEO, Kingspan Group plc
  • Netherlands, H.M. the King of the (NLD)
  • Noonan, Peggy (USA), Author and Columnist, The Wall Street Journal
  • O'Leary, Michael (IRL), CEO, Ryanair D.A.C.
  • Osborne, George (GBR), Editor, London Evening Standard
  • Papahelas, Alexis (GRC), Executive Editor, Kathimerini Newspaper
  • Papalexopoulos, Dimitri (GRC), CEO, Titan Cement Co.
  • Petraeus, David H. (USA), Chairman, KKR Global Institute
  • Pind, Søren (DNK), Minister for Higher Education and Science
  • Puga, Benoît (FRA), Grand Chancellor of the Legion of Honor and Chancellor of the National Order of Merit
  • Rachman, Gideon (GBR), Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, The Financial Times
  • Reisman, Heather M. (CAN), Chair and CEO, Indigo Books & Music Inc.
  • Rivera Díaz, Albert (ESP), President, Ciudadanos Party
  • Rosén, Johanna (SWE), Professor in Materials Physics, Linköping University
  • Ross, Wilbur L. (USA), Secretary of Commerce
  • Rubenstein, David M. (USA), Co-Founder and Co-CEO, The Carlyle Group
  • Rubin, Robert E. (USA), Co-Chair, Council on Foreign Relations and Former Treasury Secretary
  • Ruoff, Susanne (CHE), CEO, Swiss Post
  • Rutten, Gwendolyn (BEL), Chair, Open VLD
  • Sabia, Michael (CAN), CEO, Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec
  • Sawers, John (GBR), Chairman and Partner, Macro Advisory Partners
  • Schadlow, Nadia (USA), Deputy Assistant to the President, National Security Council
  • Schmidt, Eric E. (USA), Executive Chairman, Alphabet Inc.
  • Schneider-Ammann, Johann N. (CHE), Federal Councillor, Swiss Confederation
  • Scholten, Rudolf (AUT), President, Bruno Kreisky Forum for International Dialogue
  • Severgnini, Beppe (ITA), Editor-in-Chief, 7-Corriere della Sera
  • Sikorski, Radoslaw (POL), Senior Fellow, Harvard University
  • Slat, Boyan (NLD), CEO and Founder, The Ocean Cleanup
  • Spahn, Jens (DEU), Parliamentary State Secretary and Federal Ministry of Finance
  • Stephenson, Randall L. (USA), Chairman and CEO, AT&T
  • Stern, Andrew (USA), President Emeritus, SEIU and Senior Fellow, Economic Security Project
  • Stoltenberg, Jens (INT), Secretary General, NATO
  • Summers, Lawrence H. (USA), Charles W. Eliot University Professor, Harvard University
  • Tertrais, Bruno (FRA), Deputy Director, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique
  • Thiel, Peter (USA), President, Thiel Capital
  • Topsøe, Jakob Haldor (DNK), Chairman, Haldor Topsøe Holding A/S
  • Ülgen, Sinan (TUR), Founding and Partner, Istanbul Economics
  • Vance, J.D. (USA), Author and Partner, Mithril
  • Wahlroos, Björn (FIN), Chairman, Sampo Group, Nordea Bank, UPM-Kymmene Corporation
  • Wallenberg, Marcus (SWE), Chairman, Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken AB
  • Walter, Amy (USA), Editor, The Cook Political Report
  • Weston, Galen G. (CAN), CEO and Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Ltd and George Weston Companies
  • White, Sharon (GBR), Chief Executive, Ofcom
  • Wieseltier, Leon (USA), Isaiah Berlin Senior Fellow in Culture and Policy, The Brookings Institution
  • Wolf, Martin H. (INT), Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times
  • Wolfensohn, James D. (USA), Chairman and CEO, Wolfensohn & Company
  • Wunsch, Pierre (BEL), Vice-Governor, National Bank of Belgium
  • Zeiler, Gerhard (AUT), President, Turner International
  • Zients, Jeffrey D. (USA), Former Director, National Economic Council
  • Zoellick, Robert B. (USA), Non-Executive Chairman, AllianceBernstein L.P.
The 2017 Bilderberg meeting agenda is here.

Ted Kennedy: Why Do You Want to be President 1980

Monday, May 29, 2017

Mao's Cultural Revloution

The New York Times quotes Chen Xiaolu a leader of Mao's Cultural Revolution:
“I bear direct responsibility for the denouncing and criticism, and forced-labor re-education of school leaders, and some teachers and students,” Mr. Chen wrote in a blog post on his school alumni website in August that quickly circulated on the Internet. “I actively rebelled and organized the denouncements of school leaders. Later on when I served as the director of the school’s Revolution Committee, I wasn’t brave enough to stop the inhumane prosecutions.”

From the BBC:

The staff of the Heilongjiang Daily accuse an official of 'following the capitalist line'. His dunce cap announces his 'crimes'. 
 A collection of rare photographs from China's Cultural Revolution is on display in London for the first time since they were hidden for safekeeping nearly 45 years ago.

Li Zhensheng's work has been described as a "unique treasure trove of information" during one of the most turbulent periods of 20th Century history, a 10-year campaign of violence and chaos launched by Mao Zedong's feared Red Guards to enforce communism by removing capitalist, traditional and cultural elements from society.

Millions of people were persecuted in a wide range of abuses carried out across the country, including public humiliation, arbitrary imprisonment, torture and seizure of property.

Because Li Zhensheng worked for a newspaper in the north-eastern Chinese province of Heilongjiang, he was able to take state-approved images of the revolution in his capacity as a working reporter. His job at the Heilongjiang Daily also left him in the unusual position of being able to record its violence and brutality.

"My work meant that I could take photographs of people being persecuted without being harassed," Mr Li told the BBC after the exhibition opened last month.

But in such a tinder box atmosphere, he fully realised that the sensitive nature of his images meant that it was only a question of time before he too would face possible recriminations.

So Mr Li took the precaution of hiding the negatives away under the floorboards of his flat...

Originally launched by Mao to rid the Communist Party of his rivals, it ended up destroying much of China's social fabric.

At its start, Mao and his supporters mobilised thousands of young, radical Red Guards who were ordered to destroy the "four olds" in Chinese culture - old customs, habits, culture and thinking.
Colleges were shut so students could concentrate on "revolution", and as the fervour of the movement spread, they began to attack almost anything and anybody that stood for authority.

Schools and temples were destroyed, their teachers and parents vilified and, in thousands of cases, beaten to death, publicly humiliated or driven to suicide.

While this was going on, Mao and his supporters - including his former film-star wife Jiang Qing - purged the party of thousands of officials.

The Cultural Revolution officially lasted until 1976. Although the fervour of the first two years was not maintained, some areas of the country became almost ungovernable. In the cities, only the army prevented a complete breakdown of law and order.

Following Mao's death in 1976, his wife and three other radicals were officially blamed for launching and orchestrating the Cultural Revolution.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Monday, May 15, 2017

The Cobra Effect

The cobra effect occurs when an attempted solution to a problem makes the problem worse,[1][2] as a type of unintended consequence. The term is used to illustrate the causes of incorrect stimulation in economy and politics.[2]

Contents

OriginEdit

The Indian Cobra
The term cobra effect originated in an anecdote set at the time of British rule of colonial India. The British government was concerned about the number of venomous cobrasnakes in Delhi.[3] The government therefore offered a bounty for every dead cobra. Initially this was a successful strategy as large numbers of snakes were killed for the reward. Eventually, however, enterprising people began to breed cobras for the income. When the government became aware of this, the reward program was scrapped, causing the cobra breeders to set the now-worthless snakes free. As a result, the wild cobra population further increased. The apparent solution for the problem made the situation even worse.[2][4]

Rat effectEdit

A similar incident occurred in HanoiVietnam, under French colonial rule. The colonial regime created a bounty program that paid a reward for each rat killed.[3] To obtain the bounty, people would provide the severed rat tail. Colonial officials, however, began noticing rats in Hanoi with no tails. The Vietnamese rat catchers would capture rats, lop off their tails, and then release them back into the sewers so that they could procreate and produce more rats, thereby increasing the rat catchers' revenue.[5]Historian Michael Vann argues that the cobra example from British India cannot be proven, but that the rats in Vietnam case can be proven, so the term could be changed to the "rat effect".[3]

In mediaEdit

A 2001 book by German economist Horst Siebert is called The Cobra Effect.[2]
In the 1994 book by Terry PratchettSoul Music, the Patrician of Ankh-Morpork, Havelock Vetinari, figures out a similar issue with rat tails with the immortal words, "Tax the rat farms."

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brickman, Leslie H. (2002-11-01). "Preparing the 21st Century Church": 326. ISBN 978-1-59160-167-8.
  2. a b c d Siebert, Horst (2001). Der Kobra-Effekt. Wie man Irrwege der Wirtschaftspolitik vermeidet. Munich: Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt. ISBN 3-421-05562-9. (German)
  3. a b c Dubner, Stephen J. (11 October 2012). "The Cobra Effect: A New Freakonomics Radio Podcast". Freakonomics, LLC. Retrieved 24 February 2015.
  4. ^ Schwarz, Christian A. (1996). NCD Implementation Guide. Carol Stream Church Smart Resources. p. 126. Cited in Brickman, p. 326.
  5. ^ Vann, Michael G. (2003). "Of Rats, Rice, and Race: The Great Hanoi Rat Massacre, an Episode in French Colonial History". French Colonial History4: 191–203. doi:10.1353/fch.2003.0027.

(via Wikipedia)

Saturday, May 13, 2017

The Devilish Principles of Hillarycare

By Murray N. Rothbard

The standard media cliché about the Clinton health plan is that God, or the Devil, depending on your point of view, "is in the details." There is surprising agreement among both the supporters and all too many of the critics of the Clinton health "reform." The supporters say that the general principles of the plan are wonderful, but that there are a few problems in the details: e.g., how much will it cost, how exactly will it be financed, will small business get a sufficient subsidy to offset its higher costs, and on into the night.
The alleged critics of the Clinton plan also hasten to assure us that they too accept the general principles, but that there are lots of problems in the details. Often the critics will present their own alternative plans, only slightly less complex than the Clinton scheme, accompanied by assertions that their plans are less coercive, less costly, and less socialistic than the Clinton effort. And since healthcare constitutes about one-seventh of the American output, there are enough details and variants to keep a host of policy wonks going for the rest of their lives.
But the details of the Clintonian plan, however diabolic, are merely petty demons compared to the general principles, where Lucifer really lurks. By accepting the principles, and fighting over the details, the Loyal Opposition only succeeds in giving away the store, and doing so before the debate over the details can even get under way. Lost in an eye-glazing thicket of minutiae, the conservative critics of Clintonian reform, by being "responsible" and working within the paradigm set by The Enemy, are performing a vital service for the Clintonians in snuffing out any clear-cut opposition to Clinton's Great Leap Forward into health collectivism.
Let us examine some of the Mephistophelean general principles in the Clintonian reform, seconded by the conservative critics.

1. Guaranteed Universal Access

There has been a lot of talk recently about "universal access" to this or that good or service. Many "libertarian" or "free-market" proponents of education "reform," for example, advocate tax-supported voucher schemes to provide "access" to private schooling. But there is one simple entity, in any sort of free society, that provides "universal access" to every conceivable good or service, and not just to health or education or food. That entity is not a voucher or a Clintonian ID card; it's called a "dollar." Dollars not only provide universal access to all goods and services; they provide it to each dollar-holder for each product only to the extent that the dollar-holder desires. Every other artificial accessor, be it voucher or health card or food stamp, is despotic and coercive, mulcts the taxpayer, is inefficient and egalitarian.

2. Coercive

"Guaranteed universal access" can only be provided by the robbery of taxation, and the essence of this extortion is not changed by calling these taxes "fees, … premiums," or "contributions." A tax by any other named smells as rotten, and has similar consequences, even if only "employers" are forced to pay the higher "premiums."
Furthermore, for anyone to be "guaranteed" access to anything, he has to be forced to participate, both in receiving its "benefits" and in paying for them. Hence, "guaranteed universal access" means coercing not only taxpayers but everyone as participants and contributors. All the weeping and wailing about the 37 million "uninsured" glosses over the fact that most of these uninsured have a made a rational decision that they don't want to be "insured," that they are willing to take the chance of paying market prices should healthcare become necessary. But they will not be permitted to remain free of the "benefits" of insurance; their participation will become compulsory. We will all become health draftees.

3. Egalitarian

Universal means egalitarian. For the dread egalitarian theme of "fairness" enters immediately into the equation. Once government becomes the boss of all health, under the Clinton plan or the Loyal Opposition, then it seems "unfair" for a rich man to enjoy better medical care than the lowest bum. This "fairness" ploy is considered self-evident and never subject to criticism. Why is "the two-tier" health system (actually it has been multi-tier) any more "unfair" than the multi-tier system for clothing or food or transportation? So far at least, most people don't consider it unfair that some people can afford to dine at The Four Seasons and vacation at Martha's Vineyard, whereas others have to rest content with McDonald's and staying home. Why is medical care any different?
And yet, one of the major thrusts of the Clinton plan is to reduce us all to "one-tier," egalitarian healthcare status.

4. Collectivist

To ensure equality for one and all, medical care will be collectivist, under close supervision of the federal healthcare Board, with health provision and insurance dragooned by government into regional collectives and alliances. The private practice of medicine will be essentially driven out, so that these collectives and HMOs will be the only option for the consumer. Even though the Clintonians try to assure Americans that they can still "choose their own doctor," in practice this will be increasingly impossible.

5. Price Controls

Since it is fairly well known that price controls have never worked, that they have always been a disaster, the Clinton administration always keen on semantic trickery, have stoutly denied that any price controls are contemplated. But the network of severe price controls will be all too evident and painful, even if they wear the mask of "premium caps, … cost caps," or "spending control." They will have to be there, for it is the promise of "cost control" that permits the Clintonians to make the outrageous claim that taxes will hardly go up at all. (Except, of course, on employers.) Tight spending control will be enforced by the government, not merely on its own, but particularly on private spending.
One of the most chilling aspects of the Clinton plan is that any attempt by us consumers to get around these price controls, e.g., to pay higher-than-controlled prices to doctors in private practice, will be criminalized. Thus, the Clinton plan states that "a provider may not charge or collect from the patient a fee in excess of the fee schedule adopted by an alliance," and criminal penalties will be imposed for "payment of bribes or gratuities" (i.e., "black market prices") to "influence the delivery of health service."
In arguing for their plan, by the way, the Clintonians have added insult to injury by employing absurd nonsense in the form of argument. Their main argument for the plan is that healthcare is "too costly," and that thesis rests on the fact that healthcare spending, over recent years, has risen considerably as a percentage of the GDP. But a spending rise is scarcely the same as a cost increase; if it were, then I could easily argue that, since the percentage of GDP spent on computers has risen wildly in the past ten years, that "computer costs" are therefore excessive, and severe price controls, caps, and spending controls must be imposed promptly on consumer and business purchases of computers.

6. Medical Rationing

Severe price and spending controls means, of course, that medical care will have to be strictly rationed, especially since these controls and caps come at the same time that universal and equal care is being "guaranteed." Socialists, indeed, always love rationing, since it gives the bureaucrats power over the people and makes for coercive egalitarianism.
And so this means that the government, and its medical bureaucrats and underlings, will decide who gets what service. Medical totalitarians, if not the rest of us, will be alive and well in America.

7. The Annoying Consumer

We have to remember a crucial point about government as against business operations on the market. Businesses are always eager for consumers to buy their product or service. On the free market, the consumer is king or queen and the "providers" are always trying to make profits and gain customers by serving them well. But when government operates a service, the consumer is transmuted into a pain-in-the-neck, a "wasteful" user-up of scarce social resources. Whereas the free market is a peaceful cooperative place where everyone benefits and no one loses; when government supplies the product or service, every consumer is treated as using a resource only at the expense of his fellow men. The "public service" arena, and not the free market, is the dog-eat-dog jungle.
So there we have the Clintonian health future: government as totalitarian rationer of healthcare, grudgingly doling out care on the lowest possible level equally to all, and treating each "client" as a wasteful pest. And if, God forbid, you have a serious health problem, or are elderly, or your treatment requires more scarce resources than the healthcare Board deems proper, well then Big Brother or Big Sister Rationer in Washington will decide, in the best interests of "society," of course, to give you the Kevorkian treatment.

8. The Great Leap Forward

There are many other ludicrous though almost universally accepted aspects of the Clinton plan, from the gross perversion of the concept of "insurance" to the imbecilic view that an enormous expansion of government control will somehow eliminate the need for filling out health forms. But suffice it to stress the most vital point: the plan consists of one more Great Leap Forward into collectivism.
The point was put very well, albeit admiringly, by David Lauter in the Los Angeles Times (September 23, 1993). Every once in a while, said Lauter, "the government collectively braces itself, takes a deep breath and leaps into a largely unknown future." The first American leap was the New Deal in the 1930s, leaping into Social Security and extensive federal regulation of the economy. The second leap was the civil rights revolution of the 1960s. And now, writes Lauter, "another new President has proposed a sweeping plan" and we have been hearing again "the noises of a political system warming up once again for the big jump."
The only important point Mr. Lauter omits is leaping into what? Wittingly or unwittingly, his "leap" metaphor rings true, for it recalls the Great Leap Forward of Mao's worst surge into extreme communism.
The Clinton health plan is not "reform" and it doesn't meet a "crisis." Cut through the fake semantics, and what we have is another Great Leap Forward into socialism. While Russia and the former Communist states are struggling to get out of socialism and the disaster of their "guaranteed universal healthcare" (check their vital statistics), Clinton and his bizarre Brain Trust of aging leftist grad students are proposing to wreck our economy, our freedom, and what has been, for all of the ills imposed by previous government intervention, the best medical system on earth.
That is why the Clinton health plan must be fought against root and branch, why Satan is in the general principles, and why the Ludwig von Mises Institute, instead of offering its own 500-page health plan, sticks to its principled "four-step" plan laid out by Hans-Hermann Hoppe (TFM April 1993) of dismantling existing government intervention into health.
Can we suggest nothing more "positive"? Sure: how about installing Doc Kevorkian as the Clinton family physician?
The above originally appeared at Mises.org/